Carbonite is one of the web's most popular online backup services, and for good reason. The Carbonite client runs quietly in the background uploading your data to Carbonite's servers to make sure it's safe in case something happens to your computer. Carbonite can automatically back up documents, music, email, and other files (although it manually backs up video), and grants you access to those files and your archives on your smartphone. Carbonite supports Windows and OS X (although its Home Plus and Home Premier plans only support Windows), and make restoring your files as easy as backing them up. Your offsite files are encrypted to keep them safe from prying eyes, and all of their plans include unlimited storage for your backed up files. Carbonite's Home Plus plan extends its features and allows you to back up external hard drives and not just files on your computer, and allows you to back up full system images. The Home Premier plan includes both of those features and adds automatic backup of your video files, and a courier recovery service that delivers you backups on a hard drive to you ASAP if something terrible happens.

Most services encrypt your files with strong systems such as AES 256 before sending them up to the servers over an encrypted connection. The majority of products we tested also offer a private encryption key option. If you choose to manage your own encryption keys (basically the "key" that decrypts your backup), know that it is your responsibility to remember it. The online backup service itself will not be able to help you reset the password if you forget it. On the flip side, this means that no one (including employees of the backup service and law enforcement officials) other than you can unlock your backups. This is ideal from a privacy and security standpoint. Use a password manager to keep track of your private encryption key if you think you will forget it.

If you're backing up your data but you're not saving it offsite, you're putting it at risk. If something happens to your home or electronics, all that data could be lost. That's why there are tons of affordable, easy-to-use online backup services that you can send your data to seamlessly for safe keeping. This week we're going to look at five of the best, based on your nominations.
Since you're probably going to be paying for a backup service for years, cost is an important factor to consider. All the services rounded up here are subscription-based, but they partition their features and fees differently, so it's worth comparing plans closely before committing to one. Most construct pricing tiers based on the amount of cloud storage included, however, or by the number of devices you can use with an account. A few services offer permanent free accounts, but those plans impose paltry storage limits or restrict key features to the paid versions. Watch out for file-size upload limits as well.
In addition to the 5 GB free option, OpenDrive has one consumer-grade plan called Personal Unlimited. It costs $9.95 /month and offers an unlimited amount of storage space for your backed up files. Prepay for one year at $99 to bring that down to $8.25 /month. You can add an additional computer for $9.95 extra /computer, up to three extras for a total of four.
SpiderOak is well known as one of the most privacy-centric cloud storage services, but it's also a great backup service. The same power and features that you get for file syncing and access extend to its backup client, and SpiderOak's "Zero Knowledge" policy extends to your backups as well. Even they don't know what you're storing on their servers, and all of your data is encrypted on their servers and before it leaves your computer. The SpiderOak desktop client has a fully-featured backup tool in it that lets you back up your entire desktop, documents, email, music, or movies right to the cloud, or you can hit the "Advanced" tab and pick the files and folders you want to save, including external drives, network drives, or anything else on your computer. As you add files to your backup job, you'll get a live preview of how much space you'll use with what kinds of files, and whether you have space for it. SpiderOak supports Windows, OS X, and Linux, has mobile apps for iOS and Android, can do incrementals, and if you uncheck a file to stop backing it up, the files will still live in your SpiderOak account, just as an archive. Your backups happen in the background, or when you schedule them.
No honorable mentions this week, as the nominations dropped off pretty sharply from these five. Some of you pointed to your own kind of franken-backup solution that made use of traditional cloud storage services like Dropbox and Google Drive in addition with desktop utilities and clients that can automatically copy whatever you want from your computer to specified files and folders in those services, which is a great option if you want the absolute ultimate in control.

However, if you haven’t been doing this already, there is a way you can download your entire YouTube channel all at once and back up an entire archive of it, either now or sometime in the future, if you’d like to as well. To do that, simply sign into your Google account. If your YouTube channel is managed by a Google+ page, you may need to log in directly as that page. If you need instructions how to do that, put a link in the description below about how to set up your user name and password login, specifically just for your Google+ page.
It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order:
An online backup service's speed depends on how quickly it can encrypt, compress, and upload files to its servers. This should be of particular concern if you need to back up (or restore) a large amount of data. A high-performance backup service also minimizes its effect on network and system resources. Make sure to check out our speed test results in the review of any service you're contemplating using. Backup speed should not be the sole determinant of which online backup service you use, but fast upload speeds can certainly make initial and subsequent backups less disruptive.
BackBlaze doesn't have an offline component, so you'll have to handle that yourself, but it's by far one of the most affordable options on the market. Accounts are $5/mo (you get a break if you pay up front for one or two years), and you can add more computers to the same account for another $5/mo. You can read more about Backblaze's pricing options here.
Jihosoft 4K Video Downloader is available as a completely free system that actually works for both PC and Mac users, but there’s a paid version as well. What’s really great about this YouTube video downloader is that it actually works for just about any kind of video you want to download, whether that video comes from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud, or YouTube, so you’re not stuck with just one platform. You’re also going to have the option to download in just about any resolution and still get all the audio and subtitles that usually come with the video. On top of all that, you can convert to any video format or even MP3 audio, so you’re always able to watch (or listen).

You never know what’s going to be pulled down from your favorite social media sites. That means, if the show is removed, you wouldn’t have any way to access it. If you’ve already downloaded that information, however, you’ll be able to pull it back up and watch it over and over again, however frequently you want. You don’t have to worry about whether it’s going to still be available on the social media site you use when you go back to it.


Overall, you’re going to find a range of different YouTube videos and channels out there that you might be interested in keeping around for yourself. With all of these different reasons to download YouTube channels, you’re definitely going to want to take a closer look and see which of the methods above is the best one for downloading those videos. The great thing is that each of them is going to be super easy to use and you’ll have your videos ready to go in no time. So if you want to know how to download YouTube channel, you’re going to be off to a great (and super easy) start.
When you’re looking for something to watch or listen to you want something that you’re going to enjoy, but you also want a good amount of value. With downloading an entire YouTube channel, you’re not going to have to worry about that because you’ll be able to check back in on a number of different videos and different episodes that you may or may not have seen before. This also gives you a whole lot more freedom to check out something different without having to worry about downloading yet another episode or video that you don’t have the data for.
SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.
Jihosoft 4K Video Downloader is available as a completely free system that actually works for both PC and Mac users, but there’s a paid version as well. What’s really great about this YouTube video downloader is that it actually works for just about any kind of video you want to download, whether that video comes from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud, or YouTube, so you’re not stuck with just one platform. You’re also going to have the option to download in just about any resolution and still get all the audio and subtitles that usually come with the video. On top of all that, you can convert to any video format or even MP3 audio, so you’re always able to watch (or listen).
If you’re in a place where you don’t really have internet, but you don’t want to use up the data that’s still available on your mobile device you can still get access to the information that you want. Downloading and watching videos can eat away a lot of data from your phone plan or it could take up a whole lot of bandwidth that you really don’t want to be using. Instead, you could have the video already downloaded and ready to play without you having to continue using up the data.
Many services also offer a feature called versioning. This saves incremental changes you make to files as recoverable snapshots of the file. It's useful in case you need to get back information from an earlier version or if your latest file save becomes corrupted. Services vary widely in how many versions they keep and how long they're saved. Best-in-class services, such as SOS Online Backup and SpiderOak ONE keep an unlimited number of file versions forever.

PCMag, PCMag.com and PC Magazine are among the federally registered trademarks of Ziff Davis, LLC and may not be used by third parties without explicit permission. The display of third-party trademarks and trade names on this site does not necessarily indicate any affiliation or the endorsement of PCMag. If you click an affiliate link and buy a product or service, we may be paid a fee by that merchant.

Depending on how many videos you have in your channel and what your video quality is like that you uploaded and everything, this could be a really large file. So give it a lot of time to prepare and then to download. And make sure you have plenty of disk space on your computer to save all of that if it is a really large file. If I went through this too fast or you want to have more detailed instructions, I’ll put a link in the description below this video that will take you through a step-by-step walk through details of how to download and archive your entire YouTube channel, if you want to back it up and save for later.


CrashPlan is our favorite backup tool for Windows, for the Mac, and we've even shown you how to build a bulletproof backup solution with it. CrashPlan gives you the flexibility to back up any folders you select on your computer (or whole drives, if you prefer) to external hard drives, other computers on the same network, a friend's computer across the internet, or online to CrashPlan's own servers, where it's stored and encrypted to keep your data safe. The backup utility is set-it-and-forget-it, and it runs quietly in the background whenever you're away from your computer, or at specified times of day. It's smart enough to only do differentials and incrementals, and supports multiple backup destinations so you can back everything up at one time everywhere it needs to go. Restores are just as easy, and a few clicks drops all of your files right back where they should be. You even get access to your backup data on your mobile devices. If you have a ton of data to back up or restore, you can even have CrashPlan send an external hard drive to your house that you can back up to and use to seed your first backups or restore from, all without blowing past your ISP's bandwidth limitations. You can read more about CrashPlan's features here.
Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here.
×