This program is straightforward to use because there are only a few simple steps to download YouTube videos and channels. The first is that you need to copy and paste the specific URL for the video or channel that you’re trying to download. From there, you get to select the specific video resolution that you want to use. Then, just download the video. It really is that simple to get the access you’re looking for. If you want to convert the videos that’s an option too, so you may want to check it out as a free option.
Some services go above and beyond, including extra capabilities that improve the experience. For example, a few offer disk courier services for bulk uploads and restores via an external drive that the company ships and manages. A couple of these services throw in a local backup component, too. If you go that route, you should take a look at our roundup of best external hard drives. Some of these services can even track your device's location and let you remotely wipe it in case it's lost or stolen.

Yeah, I wouldn’t have a backup channel and that way we were publishing the same video with YouTube twice. Problem with that is you have two– the video is going to compete with each other and search results and search unrelated videos. You don’t want to split all your views among two videos. I know some people who will upload it to a second channel and just keep them private there. But what sense does that make?
Today, if you have a YouTube channel that you have spent a lot of time creating and promoting, and your accounts gets banned by YouTube (which happens to marketers EVERY SINGLE DAY) then you're out of luck. With this software, if you had your channel backed up, you just point your backed up video data (title, thumbnail, mp4 file, description, tags... everything!) at your new YouTube account and in a matter of minutes you have a completely cloned channel with all of the videos and data restored. It's almost magical how easily it all works.
BackBlaze doesn't have an offline component, so you'll have to handle that yourself, but it's by far one of the most affordable options on the market. Accounts are $5/mo (you get a break if you pay up front for one or two years), and you can add more computers to the same account for another $5/mo. You can read more about Backblaze's pricing options here.
An online backup service isn't much use if it doesn't make the process of restoring or recovering your data quick and simple. For example, a service should offer search tools for finding particular files in your backup. It's also desirable for a service to be able to replicate an entire folder-tree structure so that it can help you recover from bigger data losses. Keep in mind that if you buy a plan that covers just one computer, you may have to transfer the account to a new PC if you ever switch your main device or if you need to restore data from a damaged computer to a replacement.
Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here. 

The next page will show a list of all Google products associated with your account whose data can be backed up. All of them will be selected by default, so make sure to unselect all and select only youtube. An easy way would be to untick the "Select All" button at the top which will unselect all items. Then scroll down and check the "YouTube" option.
Carbonite is online backup only, so it doesn't really work well for local backups or backups to external drives. You'll still have to handle that yourself. You can try Carbonite for free for 15 days, but after that you'll need to pay up $60/yr to back up one computer with their Home plan, $100/yr to back up one computer with their Home Plus plan, and $150/ur to back up one computer with their Home Premium plan. You can read more about Carbonite's plans and pricing here.

Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
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YouTube By Click is much more than the easiest YouTube Channels Downloader! You Can download YouTube playlists. Download from almost any video site including Vimeo, Dailymotion, Facebook and many more! It's very intuitive and easy to use! Supports downloading of private YouTube and Facebook Videos. YouTube By Click has no limitation, It supports all qualities, including HD and all formats. With YouTube By Click you can download video of any length, even very long videos. YouTube By Click is 100% free!
If you're backing up your data but you're not saving it offsite, you're putting it at risk. If something happens to your home or electronics, all that data could be lost. That's why there are tons of affordable, easy-to-use online backup services that you can send your data to seamlessly for safe keeping. This week we're going to look at five of the best, based on your nominations.

We all know that we should back up our video files on a regular basis and how disruptive and even devastating it can be to lose our entire library of video content. Even with the best of intentions, hard drives can break or we can fall out of the routine of saving our footage in the cloud. Luckily, any video files uploaded in the past to YouTube can easily be salvaged by the channel owner as the site keeps a copy of all your uploaded video content. There are two ways of retrieving these files either #1) go to video manager and download the MP4 although you can only download 2 videos per hour this way or #2) download the entire archive. We show you both options in this week’s Creators Tip.
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Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here.
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