Yeah, I wouldn’t have a backup channel and that way we were publishing the same video with YouTube twice. Problem with that is you have two– the video is going to compete with each other and search results and search unrelated videos. You don’t want to split all your views among two videos. I know some people who will upload it to a second channel and just keep them private there. But what sense does that make?

We all know that we should back up our video files on a regular basis and how disruptive and even devastating it can be to lose our entire library of video content. Even with the best of intentions, hard drives can break or we can fall out of the routine of saving our footage in the cloud. Luckily, any video files uploaded in the past to YouTube can easily be salvaged by the channel owner as the site keeps a copy of all your uploaded video content. There are two ways of retrieving these files either #1) go to video manager and download the MP4 although you can only download 2 videos per hour this way or #2) download the entire archive. We show you both options in this week’s Creators Tip.

Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here. 

If you deal with videos professionally and need to be in constant collaboration with clients and colleagues, Google Drive can’t be beaten to backup videos. Its integrated file sharing option is a breeze to use, and all you or anyone you share your files with requires is a Gmail account (and let’s be honest here, who doesn’t have a Gmail account these days?).
Depending on how many videos you have in your channel and what your video quality is like that you uploaded and everything, this could be a really large file. So give it a lot of time to prepare and then to download. And make sure you have plenty of disk space on your computer to save all of that if it is a really large file. If I went through this too fast or you want to have more detailed instructions, I’ll put a link in the description below this video that will take you through a step-by-step walk through details of how to download and archive your entire YouTube channel, if you want to back it up and save for later.

Since you're probably going to be paying for a backup service for years, cost is an important factor to consider. All the services rounded up here are subscription-based, but they partition their features and fees differently, so it's worth comparing plans closely before committing to one. Most construct pricing tiers based on the amount of cloud storage included, however, or by the number of devices you can use with an account. A few services offer permanent free accounts, but those plans impose paltry storage limits or restrict key features to the paid versions. Watch out for file-size upload limits as well.
If you think of video files and Cloud storage, your mind will probably jump to slow upload times and costly storage space. This doesn’t have to be the case. Whether you’re looking to share home movie files with family members or are making a slew of promotional videos for your latest client, there’s a backup provider that meets your individual video-related needs – and this list is a good place to start looking!
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