For this software, you just need to copy the YouTube link and paste it directly into the box that’s labeled for the link. Then you get to choose the format that you want to download it into. You’re going to need to download their specific software in order to be able to download, but then you just have to click to download, and you’re all set. It really is just that easy. You can even tell it to download multiple URLs at the same time, so you can fill in everything you want to download and tell it to start while you head off to do other things.
Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn't included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don't just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.

It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order: 

When you’re looking for something to watch or listen to you want something that you’re going to enjoy, but you also want a good amount of value. With downloading an entire YouTube channel, you’re not going to have to worry about that because you’ll be able to check back in on a number of different videos and different episodes that you may or may not have seen before. This also gives you a whole lot more freedom to check out something different without having to worry about downloading yet another episode or video that you don’t have the data for.
Online backup services scan your hard drive for files worthy of protecting, encrypt them for security, and send them up to the company's online servers. Once your files are uploaded, you can access and restore your data from anywhere. Though there's some overlap, online backup services shouldn't be confused with cloud storage and file syncing services like Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, and SugarSync. Those services do store files in the cloud, but they aren't designed to automatically protect all important documents and media files, let alone system files. Their strategy is generally to sync just one folder with all its subfolders to the cloud, and in some cases, to offer online collaborative document editing. Many backup services offer folder-syncing capabilities, but few syncing services offer full-scale backup functionality.
If you deal with videos professionally and need to be in constant collaboration with clients and colleagues, Google Drive can’t be beaten to backup videos. Its integrated file sharing option is a breeze to use, and all you or anyone you share your files with requires is a Gmail account (and let’s be honest here, who doesn’t have a Gmail account these days?).

Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here.
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