We all know that we should back up our video files on a regular basis and how disruptive and even devastating it can be to lose our entire library of video content. Even with the best of intentions, hard drives can break or we can fall out of the routine of saving our footage in the cloud. Luckily, any video files uploaded in the past to YouTube can easily be salvaged by the channel owner as the site keeps a copy of all your uploaded video content. There are two ways of retrieving these files either #1) go to video manager and download the MP4 although you can only download 2 videos per hour this way or #2) download the entire archive. We show you both options in this week’s Creators Tip.
SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order:
Bitcasa Infinite Drive is relatively new, but it's one of your favorite cloud storage providers in general, mostly because they offer virtually unlimited stroage for syncing and backups. When we say unlimited, we mean it—some of you are using terabytes of storage with Bitcasa. It's not primarily a backup service though, and while it was built for file syncing and storage, the Bitcasa desktop client does support regular file backups. Bitcasa supports Windows and OS X, and encrypts all of your files before uploading so they stay safe from prying eyes. Bitcasa even keeps revision history, so if you've backed up a file multiple times and need an older version, you can pick it out and restore it. Plus, you can use the Bitcasa mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone to access your data on the go.
For this software, you just need to copy the YouTube link and paste it directly into the box that’s labeled for the link. Then you get to choose the format that you want to download it into. You’re going to need to download their specific software in order to be able to download, but then you just have to click to download, and you’re all set. It really is just that easy. You can even tell it to download multiple URLs at the same time, so you can fill in everything you want to download and tell it to start while you head off to do other things.
Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here.
If you're backing up your data but you're not saving it offsite, you're putting it at risk. If something happens to your home or electronics, all that data could be lost. That's why there are tons of affordable, easy-to-use online backup services that you can send your data to seamlessly for safe keeping. This week we're going to look at five of the best, based on your nominations.
Carbonite's lowest tier plan, Safe Basic, runs $6.00 /month ($71.99 /year). There are two higher tiers available as well, called Safe Plus and Safe Prime, and run $9.34 /month ($111.99 /year) and $12.50 /month ($149.99 /year), respectively. Each tier is a bit cheaper if two or three years is paid upfront. Plus, they each have a few extras over the base service like external hard drive and mirror image support.
It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order:

Overall, you’re going to find a range of different YouTube videos and channels out there that you might be interested in keeping around for yourself. With all of these different reasons to download YouTube channels, you’re definitely going to want to take a closer look and see which of the methods above is the best one for downloading those videos. The great thing is that each of them is going to be super easy to use and you’ll have your videos ready to go in no time. So if you want to know how to download YouTube channel, you’re going to be off to a great (and super easy) start.
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We all know that we should back up our video files on a regular basis and how disruptive and even devastating it can be to lose our entire library of video content. Even with the best of intentions, hard drives can break or we can fall out of the routine of saving our footage in the cloud. Luckily, any video files uploaded in the past to YouTube can easily be salvaged by the channel owner as the site keeps a copy of all your uploaded video content. There are two ways of retrieving these files either #1) go to video manager and download the MP4 although you can only download 2 videos per hour this way or #2) download the entire archive. We show you both options in this week’s Creators Tip.
Those looking for a free YouTube channel downloader that will allow them to get access to all of their favorite videos and channels directly on their own device will most definitely want to see these top options. Each of these five methods will provide you with a way to get the most out of the platform and also to make sure you never run out of things to watch. All you have to do is figure out which method works the best and just how it goes, which we’ll go over right here.
CrashPlan is completely free if you're just doing local backups, but even online backups are affordable, with CrashPlan+ accounts starting at $2/mo (per computer) for 10GB of online backup storage, and going up to $4/mo (per computer) for unlimited online backup storage and $9/mo for unlimited online backup storage for a whole household. You can check out their plans here, and try them free for 30 days with a new account.
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