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There are a few common practices for configuring when backups occur. The most common option is on a fixed schedule, such as once a day, week, or month. The second, which we prefer, is to upload file changes whenever they're changed and saved, otherwise known as a continuous backup setting. Services only transfer the modified part of the file in this scenario, so as not to overburden your internet connection or take up unnecessary storage. A third way is simply to upload files manually. Some may appreciate this degree of control, but this method is only effective if you remember to regularly run the backup.
Another problem many people run into with not downloading videos is that they often forget how they got there in the first place. You might forget the title or who posted the video or even some of the key features. That makes it difficult to find the video again in the future. When it comes to downloading those videos, however, you won’t have to worry about that because you’ll have the videos you like to watch available right there. You won’t have to worry about how you’re going to track it down later on because you’ll have it in whatever folder you want with a name that means something to you.
But after you have logged in, then go to Google Takeout, that’s at google.com/settings/takeout. Confirm that your channel’s icon is the one that’s displaying in the upper right corner of the screen, and then select the Google products that you want to archive and download for your backup, including YouTube. Then click Next, and then Create Archive. You have to wait a little while for the archive to be created, and then after that you can’t download all of your data.
Ben Moore is an Analyst for PCMag's software team covering video streaming services, security software, GNU/Linux, and the occasional PC game. He has previously written for Laptop Mag, Neowin.net, and Tom's Guide. Ben holds a degree in New Media and Digital Design from Fordham University at Lincoln Center, where he served as the Editor-in-Chief of The Observer, the student-run newspaper.
BackBlaze doesn't have an offline component, so you'll have to handle that yourself, but it's by far one of the most affordable options on the market. Accounts are $5/mo (you get a break if you pay up front for one or two years), and you can add more computers to the same account for another $5/mo. You can read more about Backblaze's pricing options here.
For this software, you just need to copy the YouTube link and paste it directly into the box that’s labeled for the link. Then you get to choose the format that you want to download it into. You’re going to need to download their specific software in order to be able to download, but then you just have to click to download, and you’re all set. It really is just that easy. You can even tell it to download multiple URLs at the same time, so you can fill in everything you want to download and tell it to start while you head off to do other things.
Bitcasa starts you off with 10GB for free, but $100/yr throws the floodgates open and gets you unlimited storage for anything you want to sync, share, or back up. Plus, you can connect as many computers or devices to your account as you choose, so you don't pay by the PC. It's client isn't quite as robust as some of the other tools here, but if you're more interested in a flat fee for unlimited space and you can handle the details of which files go where and when, it's a solid option. You can read more about Bitcasa's pricing here.
Here at BestBackups, we put together all of our Top Backups lists with the aim of introducing our readers to the best online storage and backup solutions available. However, due to the varying needs of consumers with video files, the best services to backup videos roundup was made taking a slightly different approach to our standard 1-5 ranking. Instead, we focused on a few key features that we believed ticked all the most important boxes and drew attention to the services that do them best.
Yeah, I wouldn’t have a backup channel and that way we were publishing the same video with YouTube twice. Problem with that is you have two– the video is going to compete with each other and search results and search unrelated videos. You don’t want to split all your views among two videos. I know some people who will upload it to a second channel and just keep them private there. But what sense does that make?
It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order:
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